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“Chain” Was Also Thrown Out

August 21, 2017

“Later” in the week, the first word a clue, perhaps comments on Deborah Harry and Blondie still so great and another great deeming to appear with one who does not rate, alas it is TOO LATE.

Thus this brilliance, these facts, this information from Merriam Webster–they deserve the since 1825 “plug.”

Is that context of plug in their dictionary? My mother, unlike his mother who never would have defended the “other guy,” giving him more confidence/arrogance but overall more chance for success despite character, did say he “worked for it,” also would have said “look it up.”

Definition of led
past tense and past participle of lead
Explore Merriam-Webster

lead and led
There is some persistent confusion about lead and led. Or, we should say, there is confusion about the leads and led. Lead is both a noun and a verb, as most people know. There are several unrelated nouns spelled lead: one most commonly refers to a metal (as in, “The paint was made with lead”), and the other most commonly refers to a position of advantage (as in, “Our team was in the lead”). The verb lead is pronounced /LEED/, with a long e; the noun that refers to a position or advantage is also pronounced /LEED/, with a long e; the noun that refers to the metal, however, is pronounced /LED/, with a short e. To this moderately convoluted situation, add the past tense and past participle of the verb lead, which is led and pronounced like the metal noun lead with a short e. The homophonic confusion leads to homographic confusion, and you will therefore occasionally see lead in constructions where led is called for (as in, “She lead the ducklings to safety” instead of “She led the ducklings to safety”). The correct past and past participle of lead is spelled led. If you aren’t sure whether to use led or lead as the verb in your sentence, try reading it aloud to yourself. If the verb is pronounced /LED/, use led.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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